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Relic Watches Women





relic watches women






    watches
  • Secretly follow or spy on

  • Issued when the risk of hazardous weather is significant.

  • Keep under careful or protective observation

  • A watch is a timepiece that is made to be worn on a person. It is usually a wristwatch, worn on the wrist with a strap or bracelet. In addition to the time, modern watches often display the day, date, month and year, and electronic watches may have many other functions.

  • Traditionally, a 24-hour day is divided into seven watches. These are: midnight to 4 a.m. [0000-0400], the mid-watch; 4 to 8 a.m. [0400-0800], morning watch; 8 a.m. to noon [0800-1200], forenoon watch; noon to 4 p.m. [1200-1600], afternoon watch; 4 to 6 p.m.

  • Look at or observe attentively, typically over a period of time





    relic
  • keepsake: something of sentimental value

  • An object, custom, or belief that has survived from an earlier time but is now outmoded

  • an antiquity that has survived from the distant past

  • An object surviving from an earlier time, esp. one of historical or sentimental interest

  • A part of a deceased holy person's body or belongings kept as an object of reverence

  • A relic is an object or a personal item of religious significance, carefully preserved with an air of veneration as a tangible memorial. Relics are an important aspect of some forms of Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Shamanism, and many other religions.





    women
  • An adult human female

  • (woman) a female person who plays a significant role (wife or mistress or girlfriend) in the life of a particular man; "he was faithful to his woman"

  • A female worker or employee

  • (woman) charwoman: a human female employed to do housework; "the char will clean the carpet"; "I have a woman who comes in four hours a day while I write"

  • A wife, girlfriend, or lover

  • (woman) an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"











Blessed Elizabeth Renzi




Blessed Elizabeth Renzi





First class relic of Blessed Elizabeth (Elisabetta) Renzi, foundress of the Sisters of Our Lady of Sorrows. My first relic of 2011! Thanks be to God!

Ex ossibus - from the bones of Bl. Elizabeth Renzi

BIOGRAPHY OF BLESSED ELIZABETH RENZI
Blessed Elisabetta Renzi was born on November 19, 1786, in the village of Saludecio, Italy, from wealthy and devout parents, Giambattista Renzi and Vittoria Boni. As a young child she was educated and catechized by the Poor Clares in a boarding school not far from her house. As a teenager, she asked permission of her parents to enter the Augustinian monastery at Pietrarubbia. There she lived a remote and impoverished life with the cloistered nuns and became a novice. Before completing the novitiate, a decree by Napoleon caused all religious houses to close and at that point she went back to her parents’ home. For the next several years, she remained with her family, uncertain of what would become of her life. She had a strong desire to live out a religious vocation, but at that particular time in history, it was no longer a possibility. As the years went by, Elisabetta became dissatisfied with her life and felt a longing for something more than what she was living. She felt a calling to give her life to the service of God. Elisabetta’s spiritual director invited her to explore a small conservatory, laboratory for girls, in the town of Coriano. It was there, that Elisabetta began to work as a teacher and became a role model for poor girls. Elisabetta’s desire was to educate young women in the responsibilities and duties of being a good mother and wife, as well as to educate them in the basic subjects of reading, math, and above all religion. She believed that if young girls become good and holy women, their families, in turn, would become good and holy families. During this time, Elisabetta desired to join the Daughters of Charity, the congregation of Maddalena of Canossa, yet, God had something else in mind for her. In 1828, Elisabetta became director of the small laboratory school in Coriano and she was also encouraged to start her own religious Congregation. On August 26, 1839, Elisabetta received diocesan approval to begin a new religious congregation and three days later, on August 29, Elisabetta and ten companions received the religious habit of the Sisters of Our Lady of Sorrows. She and her sisters continued to serve God’s people through education – focusing on the young, the poor, the weak, and the needy. On August 14, 1859, after a life of struggle and suffering, but also of great spiritual joy, Bl. Elisabetta died, leaving both to her congregation and to the universal Church an example of holiness of life and of great trust in God. She left her daughters with these farewell words: “Unless the members of our Congregation will remain united with Jesus, it will certainly cease to exist. Jesus is here and He is always with you. He alone has founded the Congregation; He alone will keep watch over it. I didn’t do anything! I have done nothing but to undo his work. Let us love our good God! I . . . I, in the blessedness that I hope to reach through his goodness and mercy; you, still among humiliations and struggles. I ask pardon of everyone for all my faults and omissions. Pray for me! Good-bye, beloved daughters; be generous with the Lord. I carry all of you in my heart and I bless you . . .We will see each other up there in heaven . . . up there . . . And from up there I will tell you again to be grateful to the Lord. Let your faithfulness be your thanksgiving, since the more you receive, the more God will ask of you my daughters . . .” (Bl. Elisabetta Renzi)











DSC 0038-2




DSC 0038-2





She Who Watches.

This is a photo of the reproduced version displayed at the Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center in Stevenson Warshington.

When I was a boy my dad took me to see the real version at Horsethief Lake. We used to go out as a family on field trips to the gorge as often as we could. My dad was born in The Dalles and was a great guide to the area. When I was a boy gathering arrowheads and beads in the gravel along the Columbia River was a family outing, today it's a crime. Today wind surfers are unknowingly walking over, and possibly damaging these relics on the beaches that we used to go.

There are many more picto and petroglyphs in this area. It's a very sacred place. Today, because of assholes that have vandalized the rock art the area is closed to visitors. Visitation to the area is allowed twice a week, Friday and Saturday mornings and you are guided by a park ranger.

I was profoundly affected by the power of the rock art there, especially Tsagagalal. I remember one of my great aunts telling me a story about her. She explained that the eyes follow those with some sort of guilt. Of course, the eyes seem to follow everyone.

THE LEGEND OF TSAGAGLALAL

THERE are several versions of the legend, but the one that was told to us by the Wishram people is as follows:

A woman had a house where the village of Nixluidix was later built. She was chief of all who lived in the region. That was a long time before Coyote came up the river and changed things and people were not yet real people. After a time Coyote in his travels came to this place and asked the inhabitants if they were living well or ill. They sent him to their chief who lived up on the rocks, where she could look down on the village and know what was going on.

Coyote climbed up to the house on the rocks and asked "What kind of living do you give these people? Do you treat them well or are you one of those evil women?" "I am teaching them to live well and build good houses," she said.

"Soon the world will change," said Coyote, "and women will no longer be chiefs." Then he changed her into a rock with the command, "You shall stay here and watch over the people who live here."

All the people know that Tsagaglalae sees all things, for whenever they are looking at her those large eyes are watching them.

"Stone Age on the Columbia River" by Emory Strong, 1959

Explore Sep 18, 2009 #435









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